Dec 03, 2021  
2021-2022 General Catalog 
    
2021-2022 General Catalog

Course Descriptions


 

General Phys Ed and Health

  
  •  

    PEH 949 - Special Topics


    2 credits
    The department will offer from time to time credit offerings in selected special areas of interest on a topical basis per semester.


Physical Education Training

  
  •  

    PET 105 - Basic Athletic Training


    3 credits
    This course will provide a knowledge and understanding of the prevention and care of athletic injuries and medical safety problems relating to physical activity. This is one of the four courses that meet the requirements for the coaching authorization issued by the Iowa Department of Education.

    Fees
    Course Materials: $15.00





  
  •  

    PET 119 - Intro to Biomechanics


    3 credits
    This course deals with the study of muscles as they are involved in the science of human movement. Since muscles attach to bones through tendons, both skeletal and muscular structures are involved. At the completion of this course the student should be able to (1) identify on a human skeleton and/or a living subject the most important bones and bony features for the major joints of the body, (2) label the important bones and bony features on a skeletal chart, (3) draw and label major muscles on a skeletal chart, (4) identify and palpate these muscles on a human subject, (5) list and organize the muscles that produce the primary movements for all the major joints of the body, and (6) analyze basic movements in terms of muscle actions. Information will also be presented on how to strengthen and stretch most of these muscles.

  
  •  

    PET 141 - Athletic Training Field Experience


    3 credits
    This class is designed to give students whom are interested in the field of Athletic Training the hands on experiences in the training room, as well as on the practice and playing fields. The students will assist Certified Athletic Trainers in the daily operations of the training room, practice and game preparation, as well as game coverage. Students will assist in evaluations, as well as observe treatments and partaking in the evaluation, as rehabilitation process of the student athletes. Students will also receive a brief history of Sports Medicine.


Intercollegiate Phys Ed

  
  •  

    PEV 101 - Varsity Sports Conditioning


    1 credits
    This course includes the conditioning and sport-specific activities and drills performed by student athletes in preparation for varsity sports participation. A variety of conditioning activities are emphasized, such as strength training, stretching, endurance, agility, and balance exercises. Related topics include methods of weight training, flexibility, aerobic exercises, safety, rehabilitation, and nutrition plans in preparation for varsity sports participation.

  
  •  

    PEV 102 - Varsity Sports Conditioning 2


    1 credits
    This course includes the conditioning and sport-specific activities and drills performed by student athletes in preparation for varsity sports participation. A variety of conditioning activities are emphasized, such as strength training, stretching, endurance, agility, and balance exercises. Related topics include methods of weight training, flexibility, aerobic exercises, safety, rehabilitation, and nutrition plans in preparation for varsity sports participation. This class is specifically for sophomore students.

    Prerequisites
    PEV 101 - Varsity Sports Conditioning   

  
  •  

    PEV 105 - Varsity Sports Participation


    1 credits
    This course includes the knowledge and skills gained through participation in an intercollegiate sport at Iowa Central Community College. Participants must meet NJCAA eligibility requirements and must complete the season as a squad member.

  
  •  

    PEV 106 - Varsity Sports Participation 2


    1 credits
    This course includes the knowledge and skills gained through participation in an intercollegiate sport at Iowa Central Community College. Participants must meet NJCAA eligibility requirements and must complete the season as a squad member. This class is specifically for sophomore students.

    Prerequisites
    PEV 105 - Varsity Sports Participation   

  
  •  

    PEV 156 - Drill Team


    1 credits
    This course includes the knowledge and skills gained through participation in a collegiate activity at Iowa Central Community College. A maximum of 4 semester hours may be earned; however, no more than 1 semester hour of credit may be earned per semester.

  
  •  

    PEV 190 - Varsity Spirit Squad


    1 credits
    This course includes the knowledge and skills gained through participation in a collegiate activity at Iowa Central Community College. A maximum of 4 semester hours may be earned; however, no more than 1 semester hour of credit may be earned per semester.

  
  •  

    PEV 949 - Dance Technique and Fundamentals


    1 credits
    This course is designed to explore the techniques and advanced skills of dance and body movement. The purpose is to provide instruction of technical elements necessary for competitive level dancers. This class will implement and combine all areas of preparation for the well rounded athletic dancer to aid in preparation of routines for performance and continued dance education and experience.


Philosophy

  
  •  

    PHI 101 - Introduction to Philosophy


    3 credits
    This introductory philosophy course examines the human attempt to answer questions about life, including the nature of right and wrong, our relation to others, the existence of a god, and the nature of freedom. It also includes defining truth, beauty, and knowledge. Students will analyze these questions about life while studying the work of important philosophers. This course prepares students for careers that require critical thinking, and encourages students to consider the perspectives of others.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHI 145 - Introduction to Ethical Conflicts


    3 credits
    This course explores contemporary ethical conflicts as a way to develop critical thinking skills. Students will examine various moral theories and their application to ethical problem-solving by the use of case studies. Students will determine principles upon which to base their ethical decision making. The concepts covered in this course are valuable for careers that require critical thinking, consideration of ethics and ethical conflicts, and understanding the perspectives of others.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHI 927 - Honors Study


    1-3 credits
    In this course, the student designs and completes a project of personal interest. The student will work closely with a faculty member who will act as a mentor and provide expertise throughout the semester. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    SDV 230 - Introduction to Honors  



    Fees
    None






Physical Science

  
  •  

    PHS 120 - Exploring Physical Science


    4 credits
    This course is a hands-on, inquiry-based course for prospective elementary teachers and non-science majors. Emphasis is on the search for and use of evidence as to the basis for drawing conclusions. This course aims to provide a well-grounded understanding of selected fundamental physical science concepts within electricity, light, heat, and the nature of matter. Critical thinking skills learning in this course will help prepare students for their future careers. This course satisfies a general education requirement in the Math/Science area.

  
  •  

    PHS 125 - Physical Science


    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to fundamental concepts of physical science through topics in physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, meteorology and energy to give non-science majors a better understanding of their physical environment. This course satisfies a general education requirement in the Math/Science area.

    Prerequisites
    MAT 102 - Intermediate Algebra  or equivalent


Photography

  
  •  

    PHT 106 - Introduction to Image Editing


    3 credits
    Students will develop a basic introduction to still image manipulation using industry standard software. This course will take a look at the basic, yet powerful features of Adobes Photoshop, Lightroom, and Illustrator. Students will appraise the vast possibilities of traditional tools and develop an understanding of sophisticated editing techniques. Throughout this course students will differentiate the tools needed to be more efficient in photo-editing and to increase the flexibility and quality of their artwork. It explores the theory and application of advanced techniques for image editing, compositing, conversion, file storage, and much more. The emphasis of this course will be in developing hands-on experience by completing various technical and creative projects. This course helps students build confidence in their design and editing skills while also enabling them to think critically, consider the viewpoints of others, and effectively express themselves, all of which will benefit them in the classroom, in life, and in the workforce.

    Fees
    Course Materials: $75.00





  
  •  

    PHT 120 - Concepts in Photography I


    3 credits
    An introduction of the history of photography from the medium's inception through the digital era. Emphasis is placed on understanding photographs from a variety of aesthetic, social, and cultural perspectives, including those of race, class and gender. A survey of photography's place and influence in a social, cultural, and historical context. This course helps students build confidence in their visual communication skills while also enabling them to think critically, consider the viewpoints of others, and effectively express themselves, all of which will benefit them in the classroom, in life, and in the workforce.

    Fees
    Course Materials: $50.00





  
  •  

    PHT 121 - Concepts in Photography II


    3 credits
    This seminar course familiarizes students with concepts, aesthetic trends, and practice in contemporary photography. The first half of the course examines photography from the mid-1950's to the present, using slide lectures, readings, presentations, and field work to think about important practitioners of the medium. The second half of the course includes discussion of critical topics in contemporary photography, organized around themes such as memory, surveillance, text & image, and participatory culture. This course helps students build confidence in their visual communication skills while also enabling them to think critically, consider the viewpoints of others, and effectively express themselves, all of which will benefit them in the classroom, in life, and in the workforce.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHT 185 - Photography II


    3 credits
    Technical proficiency with camera functions and composition will be increased. Posing and studio lighting methods will be introduced.  This course explores the history, aesthetics, and the conceptualization of photographic imagery. Includes darkroom procedures in developing, printing, and finishing black and white photographic materials. All photography projects and sketchbook assignments will encourage the development of a personal visual style. Other topics include: special shooting techniques, multiple exposure, and painting with light. Students will explore the work of both historical and contemporary photographers. Via self and class critiques, students will evaluate their own work and that of their peers. Participation in the student photography show is required.

    Prerequisites
    ART 184 - Photography   or PHT 183 - Photography I 

    Fees
    Course Materials: $175.00





  
  •  

    PHT 189 - Photography III


    3 credits
    Technical proficiency with camera functions and composition will be increased as students also develop advanced posing and studio lighting techniques. Students will utilize a broad range of creative photographic techniques involving digital, traditional, and artistic methods. Emphasis is on the understanding, control, and manipulation of lighting and lighting equipment using both additive and subtractive lighting techniques. Students will increase their lighting repertoire by using mixed light, location lighting, and painting with light. This course will also cover the definitions and characteristics of fine art photography. Various fine art photographers are examined with an emphasis in the visual tools they use to create fine art work. Via self- and class critiques, students will evaluate their own work and that of their peers. Participation in the student photography show is required.

    Prerequisites
    ART 184 - Photography  or PHT 183 - Photography I 

    Fees
    Course Materials: $75.00





  
  •  

    PHT 192 - Photography IV


    3 credits
    Technical proficiency with camera functions, composition skills, and posing techniques will be increased. Students will master advanced studio lighting techniques, which includes studio and portable lighting equipment and the use of mixed natural and man-made light. Photography projects and sketchbook assignments will encourage the development of a personal visual style. Students will explore the work of both historical and contemporary photographers. This course introduces historical and alternative photographic processes used in both the fine art and commercial world. Projects involving abstraction and character-portraits allow the student to creatively refine fundamental photography techniques. Via self- and class critiques, students will evaluate their own work and that of their peers. Participation in the student photography show is required. This course helps students build confidence in their visual communication skills while also enabling them to think critically, consider the viewpoints of others, and effectively express themselves, all of which will benefit them in the classroom, in life, and in the workforce.

    Prerequisites
    ART 184 - Photography  or PHT 183 - Photography I 

    Fees
    Course Materials: $100.00





  
  •  

    PHT 230 - Advanced Portraiture


    3 credits
    Students will develop advanced techniques for photographing people for portrait, fashion, or illustration purposes. Topics include the physical, psychological, and compositional aspects and characteristics of different portrait styles. Application of ethics, communication, and the business of portraiture will be covered. Projects, including both environmental portraiture and studio portraits, provide opportunities for students to explore lighting styles, subject, pose, exposure, and print presentation. Portrait photographers, critical thinking, and aesthetics in relation to personal creativity and expression in portraiture will be discussed. This course is intended for intermediate and advanced photography students. Via self- and class critiques, students will evaluate their own work and that of their peers. Required participation in the college photography show. This course helps students build confidence in their visual communication skills while also enabling them to think critically, consider the viewpoints of others, and effectively express themselves, all of which will benefit them in the classroom, in life, and in the workforce.

    Prerequisites
    ART 184 - Photography  or PHT 183 - Photography I 

    Fees
    Course Materials: $75.00





  
  •  

    PHT 233 - Commercial Photography


    3 credits
    This course provides an in-depth study of professional commercial photography. Business practices, tools, techniques, and applications are explored via demonstrations, assignments, and on-the-job partnerships with community businesses and non-profits. Students will learn to apply exposure techniques, camera filters, composition, and the types and characteristics of light unique to commercial photography. Course work includes an in-depth study of advertising photography; studio and location camera techniques and lighting; model, food, and architectural photography; layout specifications and art direction; corporate and stock photography; digital imaging applications; and current commercial business practices. Via self and class critiques, students will evaluate their own work and that of their peers. Participation in the student photography show is required. This course helps students build confidence in their visual communication skills while also enabling them to think critically, consider the viewpoints of others, and effectively express themselves, all of which will benefit them in the classroom, in life, and in the workforce.

    Prerequisites
    ART 184 - Photography  or PHT 183 - Photography I 

    Fees
    Course Materials: $75.00





  
  •  

    PHT 250 - Marketing in Photography


    2 credits
    Students will learn to identify and reach targeted potential markets in photography. After establishing an authentic personal brand, each student will incorporate their brand into a range of outreach strategies, websites, and blogging. Students will build social media marketing platforms and learn to use them effectively, develop promotional materials, such as client welcome packets, and construct effective databases. Video marketing projects will provide the opportunity to create promotional videos for clients and businesses. This course offers a unique practical approach to learning marketing ethics and focuses on building relationships among client and creator.

    Prerequisites
    PHT 185 - Photography II 

    Fees
    Course Materials: $25.00





  
  •  

    PHT 254 - Business of Photography


    3 credits
    This course will guide students through crucial processes of starting and operating a successful photography business. Students will assess various business structures and learn to navigate the business registration process. They will also develop a business plan, build a budget, create a logo, learn effective methods for pricing goods and services, and gain an understanding of tax requirements. Resume and cover letters will be created in the course. Special emphasis is placed on designing and building a business around targeted client. Students will learn to identify and reach targeted potential markets in photography. After establishing an authentic personal brand, each student will incorporate their brand into a range of outreach strategies, websites and blogging. Students will build social media marketing platforms and learn to use them effectively, develop promotional materials such as client welcome packets, and construct effective databases. Video marketing projects will provide the opportunity to create promotional videos for clients and businesses.

    Fees
    Course Materials: $50.00





  
  •  

    PHT 258 - Business of Photography


    2 credits
    This course will guide students through crucial processes of starting and operating a successful photography business. Students will assess various business structures and learn to navigate the business registration process. They will also develop a business plan, build a budget, create a logo, learn effective methods for pricing goods and services, and gain an understanding of tax requirements. Special emphasis is placed on designing and building a business around targeted clients. Students will build social media marketing platforms and learn to use them effectively, develop promotional materials such as client welcome packets, and construct effective databases. Video marketing projects will provide the opportunity to create promotional videos for clients and businesses. This course offers a unique practical approach to learning business ethics and focuses on building relationships among client and creator.

    Prerequisites
    BUS 102 - Introduction to Business  and PHT 250 - Marketing in Photography  

    Fees
    Course Materials: $25.00





  
  •  

    PHT 288 - Photography in Journalism


    3 credits
    Students will learn to shoot and select photographic images that clearly communicate stories to their viewers. Collaborative activities will consist of working with writers to illustrate news stories and meet deadlines. The ethics of photography in journalism will also be examined, including bias. Projects, which include photographing a variety of people and events, will encourage the creation of dynamic images that convey information in a clear and compelling way. Students will gain real-world experience by attending and photographing various college and community events. Students are required to participate in the college photography show. This course offers a unique practical approach to learning journalism and photography ethics which will benefit them in the classroom, in life, and in the workforce.

    Fees
    Course Materials: $75.00





  
  •  

    PHT 299 - Photography Portfolio Development


    1 credits
    Students will build a resume and prepare a professional photography portfolio that can be presented to potential clients. Students will learn to assess and select photographs for the portfolio that best represent their technique, skills, range, and area of expertise. They will professionally present their work both digitally and non-digitally. Internet and app-based portfolio tools will also be explored. This course helps students build confidence in their visual communication skills while also enabling them to think critically, consider the viewpoints of others, and effectively express themselves, all of which will benefit them in the classroom, in life, and in the workforce.

    Prerequisites
    ART 184 - Photography  or PHT 183 - Photography I 

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHT 927 - Honors Study


    1-3 credits
    In this course, the student designs and completes a project of personal interest. The student will work closely with a faculty member who will act as a mentor and provide expertise throughout the semester. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    SDV 230 - Introduction to Honors  



    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHT 947 - Practicum I


    1 credits
    A formal, cooperative field experience with a designated organization or agency. This course consists of supervised practical application (practicum) and knowledge of photography which will to lead to career-advancing opportunities. This course helps students build confidence in their visual communication skills while also enabling them to think critically, consider the viewpoints of others, and effectively express themselves, all of which will benefit them in the classroom, in life, and in the workforce.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHT 948 - Practicum II


    1 credits
    The course offers the student the opportunity to gain practical experience in the specialization of the photography industry. Students are exposed to employable skills, including job-specific skills applicable to their training plan, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations, and portfolio development. This course helps students build confidence in their visual communication skills while also enabling them to think critically, consider the viewpoints of others, and effectively express themselves, all of which will benefit them in the classroom, in life, and in the workforce.

    Fees
    None






Physics

  
  •  

    PHY 162 - College Physics I


    4 credits
    This course provides a general background for those who do not plan advanced study in physics or engineering. Topics covered include elementary mechanics, including kinematics and dynamics of particles; work and energy; linear and angular momentum; rotational motion; gravitation; thermodynamics; and oscillation. This course satisfies a general education requirement in the Math/Science area. This course will help students refine their critical thinking skills as they evaluate various topics and concepts while searching for underlying connections between the concepts, which is a skill that should be beneficial in any/all types of careers. This course will also help students gain scientific literacy which will be of vital significance when making important life decisions. 

    Prerequisites
    Minimum ALEKS math placement score of 30 is required. Enrollment in or completion of MAT 127 - College Algebra and Trigonometry  or an ALEKS math placement score above 45 is strongly recommended.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHY 172 - College Physics II


    4 credits
    This course is a continuation of PHY 162 - College Physics I . Topics covered include waves; electric forces and fields; direct and alternating currents; magnetic forces and fields; ray optics and image formation; and atomic structure. This course will help students refine their critical thinking skills as they evaluate various topics and concepts while searching for underlying connections between the concepts, which is a skill that should be beneficial in any/all types of careers. This course will also help students gain scientific literacy which will be of vital significance when making important life decisions. 

    Prerequisites
    PHY 162 - College Physics I  with a C grade or better

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHY 183 - Applied Physics


    3 credits
    The Applied Physics course blends basic technical principals with laboratory practice that involves realistic devices used by technicians in their everyday work. Students will gain hands-on experience using applied laboratory experiments to better understand mechanical, fluid, electrical and thermal systems

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHY 184 - Applied Physics


    4 credits
    The Applied Physics course blends basic technical principals with laboratory practice that involves realistic devices used by technicians in their everyday work. Students will gain hands-on experience using applied laboratory experiments to better understand mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal systems. These principles will aid the student in a more well-rounded, critical thinking mind to help them discern information later in their daily life. 

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHY 212 - Classical Physics I


    5 credits
    This course is designed to meet the needs of students planning to major in engineering and various fields of science. Topics covered include elementary mechanics, including kinematics and dynamics of particles; work and energy; linear and angular momentum; rotational motion; thermodynamics, and gravitation. This course will help students refine their critical thinking skills as they evaluate various topics and concepts while searching for underlying connections between the concepts, which is a skill that should be beneficial in any/all types of careers. This course will also help students gain scientific literacy which will be of vital significance when making important life decisions. 

    Prerequisites
    Concurrent enrollment in MAT 210 - Calculus I  or completion with a C or better. The latter is strongly recommended.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHY 222 - Classical Physics II


    5 credits
    This course is a continuation of PHY 212 - Classical Physics I . Topics covered include oscillations and waves; electric forces and fields; direct and alternating currents; magnetic forces and fields; ray optics and image formation; and atomic structure. This course will help students refine their critical thinking skills as they evaluate various topics and concepts while searching for underlying connections between the concepts, which is a skill that should be beneficial in any/all types of careers. This course will also help students gain scientific literacy which will be of vital significance when making important life decisions. 

    Prerequisites
    PHY 212 - Classical Physics I  with a C grade or better

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHY 927 - Honors Study


    1-3 credits
    In this course, the student designs and completes a project of personal interest. The student will work closely with a faculty member who will act as a mentor and provide expertise throughout the semester. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    SDV 230 - Introduction to Honors  



    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHY 948 - Special Projects


    1-4 credits
    This course is open to students showing satisfactory preparation in a particular area of interest. Involves individual topic, conferences and preparation of reports. Designed to meet the needs of students wishing to study a selected topic in depth. Permission of the instructor with whom the student wishes to work is required.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PHY 949 - Special Topics


    1-4 credits
    This course is open to students showing satisfactory preparation in a particular area of interest. Involves individual topic, conferences and preparation of reports. Designed to meet the needs of students wishing to study a selected topic in depth. Permission of the instructor with whom the student wishes to work is required.

    Fees
    None






Practical Nursing

  
  
  •  

    PNN 127 - Fundamentals of Nursing in Health Care


    5 credits
    This theory course is a requirement with PNN 121 Clinical Practicum 1  and PNN 206 Medication Administration for Nurses  for the practical nurse diploma program. This course introduces the art and science of nursing practice. Professionalism, nursing roles, critical thinking, ethical and legal concepts are emphasized. The concepts of the nursing process, communication, safety, pharmacology, the health-illness continuum, and cultural diversity are introduced. Skills and technology utilized in the routine care of adult clients in traditional health care settings are presented. This course will prepare the student with theoretical nursing knowledge needed for entry level practical nursing practice. This course will also prepare the student for national examination for practical nursing licensure.

    Fees
    Testing Charge: $530.00





  
  •  

    PNN 206 - Medication Administration for Nurses


    2.5 credits
    This theory course is a requirement with PNN 121 Clinical Practicum 1  and PNN 127 Fundamentals of Nursing in Health Care  for the practical nurse diploma program. This course provides a basic foundation of pharmacology concepts and math calculations for the adult patient in the clinical setting. Syringe usage, injections and nonparenteral routes, reconstitution, and safe medication administration are emphasized. Drug classifications, nursing implications, and side effects of medications are introduced. This course will prepare the student with theoretical nursing knowledge needed for entry level practical nursing practice. This course will also prepare the student for national examination for practical nursing licensure.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PNN 311 - PN Issues & Trends


    1 credits
    This theory course is a requirement with PNN 811 Selected Clinical Nursing  and PNN 731 Clinical Practicum  and is designed to prepare the practical nursing student for National Examination for practical nursing licensure. This course is designed to assist the practical nursing student to develop an awareness and understanding of responsibilities to self and career. The course content includes historical perspectives, ethical and legal considerations, professional organizations, leadership skills, career opportunity review, health resources, and career responsibilities.

    Prerequisites
    PNN 621 , PNN 622  

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    HSC 113 , PSY 121 , BIO 151 , BIO 168 , BIO 173 , PNN 731 , PNN 811  



    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PNN 621 - Life Span Health Care


    8.5 credits
    This theory course is a requirement with PNN 622 Clinical Practicum 2  for the practical nurse diploma program. This course is designed for the beginning nursing student and introduces the health care needs of individuals and families. It presents content on the nurses' role in health promotion, maintenance, and disease prevention while looking at the effects of the environment on the health throughout the lifespan. The focus is on common health problems associated with each body system and an introduction of pharmacology in the therapeutic management of disease. This course will prepare the student with theoretical nursing knowledge needed for entry level practical nursing practice. This course will also prepare the student for national examination for practical nursing licensure.

    Fees
    Testing Charge: $490.00





  
  •  

    PNN 622 - Clinical Practicum 2


    4 credits
    This clinical course is a requirement with PNN 621 Life Span Health Care  for the practical nurse diploma program. This course provides an opportunity for students to apply Life Span Health Care theory in the clinical setting with clients throughout the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on the nursing process and clinical judgement to implement holistic, comprehensive nursing care. This course will prepare the student with clinical knowledge and skills for entry-level practical nursing. 

    Fees
    Simulation Center Access: $50.00





  
  •  

    PNN 731 - Clinical Practicum


    2.5 credits
    This theory course is a requirement with PNN 311 PN Issues & Trends  and PNN 811 Selected Clinical Nursing  and is designed to prepare the practical nursing student for National examination for practical nursing licensure. This course provides the practical nursing student with the clinical opportunity to practice in the role of a practical nurse under the supervision of a licensed nurse and demonstrate further proficiency in the care of the medical-surgical or long-term care client and a limited experience with a leadership role.

    Corequisites
    PNN 311 , PNN 811  

    Prerequisites
    PNN 621 , PNN 622  

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    HSC 113 , BIO 151 , BIO 168 , BIO 173 , PSY 121  



    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PNN 811 - Selected Clinical Nursing


    1 credits
    This theory course is a requirement with PNN 311 PN Issues & Trends  and PNN 731 Clinical Practicum  and is designed to prepare the practical nursing student for National examination for practical nursing licensure. The course is designed to help the students review common health problems across the lifespan with emphasis on the nursing process, holistic care, and pharmacology. 

    Corequisites
    PNN 311 , PNN 731  

    Prerequisites
    PNN 621 , PNN 622  

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    HSC 113 BIO 151 , BIO 168 , BIO 173 , PSY 121  



    Fees
    None






Political Science

  
  •  

    POL 111 - American National Government


    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to American national government and politics, including major concepts and theories relating to the general principles, institutions, processes, functions, and powers of government. It also introduces students to specific public policies and problems of representative government at the national level. Topics covered include democracy, political values, constitutionalism, federalism, civil liberties, civil rights, political participation, political parties, interest groups, media, bureaucracy, political campaigns, and elections. In addition, the course examines contemporary political issues and evaluates them from the perspective of various political ideologies and theories. Knowledge of government and politics, an awareness of current issues, and an understanding of the rights and duties of citizens, are important skills for achieving success in many occupations and professions, while also contributing directly to civic responsibility and a higher quality of life.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    POL 112 - American State and Local Government


    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to American state and local government and politics, including major concepts and theories relating to the general principles, institutions, processes, functions, and powers of government. It also introduces students to specific public policies and problems of representative government at the state and local levels. Topics covered include democracy, political values, constitutionalism, federalism, civil liberties, civil rights, political participation, political parties, interest groups, media, bureaucracy, political ideologies, political campaigns, and elections. A discussion of current political issues and alternative public policies impacting on states and localities are also included in the course. Knowledge of government and politics, an awareness of current issues and policies, and an understanding of the rights and duties of citizens, are important skills for achieving success in many occupations and professions, while directly contributing to civic responsibility and a higher quality of life.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    POL 121 - International Relations


    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to the study of international affairs and global politics, including major concepts and theories relating to international systems, international security, international law, international conflict and cooperation, foreign policy, diplomacy, international organizations, and international economics. It examines the main theories of international relations including realism, liberalism, and constructivism. The course is designed to give students a better understanding of international relations in the world today by addressing global problems such as war and terrorism, nuclear proliferation, pandemics, and climate change. In addition, the historical and contemporary influences of American politics on international relations are explored. Knowledge of international affairs, an understanding of global problems, and an awareness of linkages between national and global politics, are important skills for achieving success in many occupations and professions, while also directly contributing to civic responsibility and a higher quality of life.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    POL 125 - Comparative Government and Politics


    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to the comparative study of government and politics across and within countries. It utilizes comparative methods to analyze questions of political systems, such as how they are created and organized; how and why they change; and why various political institutions generate different outcomes. The differences between nations and states, democratic and authoritarian regimes, presidential and parliamentary systems, and federal and unitary systems are emphasized. Sources of political, ethnic, and religious conflict across and within countries are also explored. Country cases are drawn from different regions of the world to ground students in a set of tools for comparative analysis. The ability to engage in comparative analysis is important for success in many occupations and professions; thereby directly contributing to a higher quality of life. In addition, the course encourages civic responsibility among students by comparing the U.S. government to other governments around world and recognizing the similar problems and challenges faced by such governments.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    POL 927 - Honors Study


    1-3 credits
    In this course, the student designs and completes a project of personal interest. The student will work closely with a faculty member who will act as a mentor and provide expertise throughout the semester. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    SDV 230 - Introduction to Honors  



    Fees
    None






Psychology

  
  •  

    PSY 111 - Introduction to Psychology


    3 credits
    This course examines the basic psychological processes of personality, social behavior, motivation, intelligence, and learning, with an emphasis on the language of modern psychology. Developing a basic understanding of psychology will help you to develop critical thinking skills, become a better consumer of information relating to human behaviors and mental processes, navigate social and occupational relationships, increase your emotional intelligence. Introduction to Psychology is a popular elective for many majors and transfers easily to other colleges. Potential careers include corrections officer, social work assistant, human resource specialist, and guidance counselor.

    Fees
    ebook/Access Code: $75.00





  
  •  

    PSY 112 - Psychology of Human Relations


    3 credits
    This course is an exploration of the psychology of human relationships and is designed to expose students to the fundamental theories underlaying relationships and facilitate a greater understanding in how these theories can be applied to relationships. This course will cover a variety of topics including the social, emotional, and biological bases of physical attraction and love; formation and dissolution of relationships; patterns of interaction within relationships; the social context of relationships; and satisfaction within relationships. Emphasis will be given to mate selection; kinship, friendship and enemyship; jealousy, betrayal and forgiveness; communication, conflict and aggression; and the processes involved in relationship collapse and restoration. Developing a basic understanding of human relations can help you understand yourself as well as those with whom you share relationships. The Psychology of Human Relations is a popular elective for many students who are pursuing an associate of arts degree. Potential careers include coaching, teaching, counseling, and human resources.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PSY 121 - Developmental Psychology


    3 credits
    This course examines the fundamental patterns of human development from conception to death within the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional domains. Each developmental period is examined through demands of the American culture. Contemporary research relating to different ages is reviewed. Learning about human development will add a deeper understanding of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional growth across the lifespan, improve your ability to understand and interact with children, develop greater understanding of human relationships, and advance your critical thinking skills. Developmental Psychology is a popular elective for many majors and transfers easily to other colleges. Potential careers include social work assistant, group home manager, human resource specialist, early childhood specialist, and guidance counselor.

    Fees
    ebook/Access Code: $75.00





  
  •  

    PSY 222 - Child Psychology


    3 credits
    This course examines the normative and non-normative influences on the physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development of children from conception to age 12. Special emphasis is given to the contextual influences on child development such as family, peers, schools, poverty, and social policy. Contemporary research in developmental areas such as the self, intelligence, emotions, parenting styles, learning, and motivation as they relate to the educational process are addressed. Learning the basic progression of development will help you have a deeper understanding of physical, emotional, cognitive, and contextual growth of children, improve your ability to understand and interact with children, and advance your critical thinking skills. Child Psychology may be required for some early childhood education certificates or programs and is a popular elective for many transfer students interested in a degree in psychology or teaching. Potential careers include early childhood specialist, paraeducator, teacher, guidance counselor, and art therapist.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PSY 224 - Adolescent Psychology


    3 credits
    This course examines the influences of hereditary and environmental relating to physical, cognitive, and emotional developmental for adolescents ages 10-19. Emphasis is given to learning theories and developmentally appropriate practices relevant to teenagers, such as pubertal development and its social consequences, changing relationships with families, self and identity development, the important role of peers, school adjustment, and high-risk behaviors. An understanding of adolescence, sometimes referred to as a time of "storm and stress," can help develop critical thinking skills and assist parents, teachers, and adolescence themselves, navigate this important developmental period. Adolescent Psychology may be required for some early childhood education certificates or programs. It is a popular elective for many transfer students interested in a degree in psychology or teaching. Potential careers include early childhood specialist, paraeducator, teacher, guidance counselor, and art therapist.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PSY 241 - Abnormal Psychology


    3 credits
    This course examines the historical, theoretical, clinical, and experimental perspectives of the study of psychopathology with emphasis on terminology, classification, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the major psychological disorders. The biopsychosocial model is used to explain a variety of psychological disorders including anxiety and mood disorders, impulse control disorders, personality disorders and schizophrenia. In the United States, almost half of adults (46.4 percent) will experience a mental health issue during their lifetime. A general understanding of the causes and conditions of psychological disorders can develop critical thinking skills and help you understand the impact of mental health on the individual, family, and community. Abnormal Psychology is a popular elective for many students who are pursuing an associate of arts degree. Potential careers include correctional officer, social work assistant, psychiatric nursing aide, and substance abuse counselor.

    Fees
    ebook/Access Code: $75.00





  
  •  

    PSY 251 - Social Psychology


    3 credits
    Social psychology is the study of how people think, feel, and behave in social environments. This involves understanding the way thoughts, beliefs, emotions, intentions, and behaviors are constructed and how such psychological factors influence our interactions with others. The major theories, research methods, and empirical findings of social psychology are addressed. Various topics include attitudes, social cognition, aggression, prosocial behavior, the self and identity, and group behavior. Having a basic understanding of the various social influences will make you a better consumer of information, develop critical thinking skills, and help you to understand the 'why' of social behaviors. Social Psychology is a popular elective for many students who are pursuing an associate of arts degree. Potential careers include human resource specialist, political strategist, public relations specialist, marketing, and post-secondary teacher.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PSY 261 - Human Sexuality


    3 credits
     

    This course examines the cognitive, cultural, biological, psychological, and socioemotional perspectives of human sexuality with the primary focus on the psychological perspective and its impact on individuals and society. The broad goal of this course includes an increased knowledge of the diverse aspects biological, developmental, and scientific aspects of human sexuality, in addition to developing a greater awareness of self and others. Some of the topics that will be covered are sexual relationships, sexual communication, sexual behaviors, sexual orientations, paraphilias, sexual aggression, pornography, and prostitution. Having a basic understanding of human sexuality will help students to develop and maintain a personal philosophy concerning sexual attitudes, decision-making, and behavior, which, in turn, can help them as future parents, educators, or counselors to better understand the process of human sexual development. 



    Fees
    ebook/Access Code: $75.00





  
  •  

    PSY 281 - Educational Psychology


    3 credits
    This course examines the theoretical and applied characteristics of the learning process in children from infancy to adolescence. Emphasis is given to the study of learning theories as well as the cognitive, emotional, and social learning processes that underlie education. Developing skills to better understand learners, foster improved learning, influence and manage classroom learning, and recognize and consider individual differences are addressed. Having a basic understanding of educational psychology can help you as a future parent or educator better understand the learning process. Educational Psychology may be required for early childhood education certificates or programs. It is a popular elective for many transfer students. Potential careers include early childhood specialist, paraeducator, teacher, guidance counselor, or assessment coordinator.

    Fees
    ebook/Access Code: $70.00





  
  •  

    PSY 927 - Honors Project


    1-3 credits
    In this course, the student designs and completes a project of personal interest. The student will work closely with a faculty member who will act as a mentor and provide expertise throughout the semester. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    SDV 230 - Introduction to Honors  



    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    PSY 949 - Sport Psychology


    3 credits
    Sport psychology is an overview of basic theoretical concepts and principles essential to understanding the psychological and behavioral aspects of sport and exercise. Emphasis is given to the conceptual frameworks and the applied aspects of sport performance enhancement and mental skills, exercise behavior and motivation, sociological factors, health and well-being, and competition. Developing a basic understanding of sport psychology can help you understand how your own mental state impacts your performance. Sport Psychology is a popular elective for many students who are pursuing an associate of arts degree. Potential careers include coaching, teaching, sports medicine, counseling, sport management, and fitness instruction.

    Fees
    None






Radiologic Technology

  
  •  

    RAD 122 - Radiographic Procedures I


    4 credits
    This course is one semester, students study positioning, and common procedures performed in the radiology department. This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. Procedures include upper and lower extremities, chest, and abdomen x-rays. A vital part of this course will be theory of exposure, radiation protection, and basic image critique. This course will help students gain the basic knowledge of radiographic positioning and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist's job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 210 , RAD 320  

    Prerequisites
     HSC 113  and a college-level math course with a C or higher

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    HSC 104 , BIO 173  



    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    RAD 142 - Radiographic Procedures II


    4 credits
    This course is one semester and a continuation of RAD 122 - Radiographic Procedures I . This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. Students will be given an in-depth, integrated coverage of the digestive system and the urinary system along with procedures of the spine, fluoroscopy exams, and trauma radiography. This course will help students gain the basic knowledge of radiology and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 230 , RAD 365 , RAD 430  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 122 , RAD 210 , RAD 320  

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    PSY 111  or PSY 112  with a C or higher



    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    RAD 163 - Radiographic Procedures III


    2.5 credits
    This course is one semester, students learn radiographic anatomy and procedures of the skull, headwork and its contents. This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. Emphasis will be given to those procedures commonly performed in the radiology department. This course will help students gain the basic knowledge of radiographic positioning headwork and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist's job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 270 , RAD 182  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 430  , RAD 365  , RAD 142  , RAD 230  

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    RAD 182 - Special Procedures


    2 credits
    This course is one semester, students study long bone measurement, contrast arthrography, contrast medias and procedures using them, reactions to contrast medias, mouth and salivary glands, anterior part of the neck and other detailed anatomy. Students will also study radiographic procedures of the central nervous and circulatory systems. Also presented are new technologies and modalities within radiology. This course will also investigate the pediatric and geriatric patient in imaging and the environment of mobile and surgical radiography. This course will help students gain the basic knowledge of special procedures in the imaging department and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist's job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 163 , RAD 270  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 142 , RAD 230 , RAD 365 , RAD 430  

    Fees
    Simulation Center Access: $25.00





  
  •  

    RAD 210 - Clinical Education I


    4 credits
    This course is one semester which enables the student to become oriented to the health facility and the department of radiology. This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. Time is allotted the student to observe procedures, under direct supervision and gain beginning skills in radiography. This course will help students gain the basic knowledge of radiology and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 122 , RAD 320  

    Prerequisites
    BIO 168 , HSC 113  and a college-level math course with a C or higher

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    BIO 173 , HSC 104  



    Fees
    Course Materials: $150.00





  
  •  

    RAD 230 - Clinical Education II


    4 credits
    This course is one semester and is a continuation of RAD 210 - Clinical Education I . This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. In addition to doing the procedures learned in the first semester, the student observes more complex examinations and gradually assumes an increasing amount of responsibility for the performance of those procedures. This course will help students gain the basic knowledge of radiology and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 142 , RAD 430 , RAD 365  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 122 , RAD 210 , RAD 320  

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    PSY 111  or PSY 112  with a C or higher



    Fees
    Course Materials: $30.00





  
  •  

    RAD 270 - Clinical Education III


    3.5 credits
    This course is one semester, this clinical practicum builds on RAD 210 - Clinical Education I  and RAD 230 - Clinical Education II . This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. Students experience rotations through radiology modalities as part of the clinical education. This course will help students gain the basic knowledge of an entry-level radiologic technologist along with an opportunity to learn about the modalities in radiology, all while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 182 , RAD 163  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 142 , RAD 230 , RAD 365 , RAD 430  

    Fees
    Course Materials: $30.00





  
  •  

    RAD 320 - Imaging I


    2 credits
    This course is one semester and introduces the principles of radiographic imaging. This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. Students will explore present and historical methods of recording radiographic images. Special emphasis will be placed on the factors that determine image quality. This course will help students gain the basic knowledge of radiographic imaging and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist's job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 122 , RAD 210  

    Prerequisites
    BIO 168 , HSC 113  and a college-level math course with a C or higher

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    HSC 104 , BIO 173  



    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    RAD 365 - Imaging II


    2 credits
    This course is one semester and a continuation of RAD 320 - Imaging I . This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. Students continue to explore the principles of radiographic imaging. Imaging principles will involve the following concepts digital imaging, automatic processing, image characteristics, and geometrical factors. This course will help students gain the basic knowledge of advanced radiographic imaging and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 230 , RAD 142 , RAD 430  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 210 , RAD 122 , RAD 320  

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    PSY 111   or PSY 112   with a C or higher



    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    RAD 430 - Radiographic Physics


    3 credits
    This course is one semester, students explore the physical concepts of energy, the structure of matter, electrostatics, electrodynamics, magnetism, electromagnetism, electric generators and motors. This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. The principles of electricity are studied as it relates to x-ray circuits, rectification, and x-ray production. X-ray tubes, rating charts, and interaction of x-rays with matter are included. This course will help students gain the basic knowledge of radiographic physics and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 365 , RAD 142 , RAD 230  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 320  , RAD 122  , RAD 210  

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    PSY 111   or PSY 112   with a C or higher



    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    RAD 510 - Clinical Education IV


    6 credits
    This is a one semester course; clinical experience in the fourth semester is primarily spent continuously improving the techniques and procedures previously experienced, with ongoing image critique. This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. This course will help students gain the basic knowledge of radiology and image critique and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 770 , RAD 896  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 163 , RAD 182 , RAD 270  

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    ENG 105  and a computer course with a C or higher



    Fees
    Course Materials: $30.00





  
  •  

    RAD 570 - Clinical Education V


    8 credits
    This is a one semester course; and serves as a continuation of clinical experience providing opportunities to demonstrate competency in all phases of radiologic technology. This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree Students will gain independence and proficiency with all radiographic procedures. This course will help students gain the basic knowledge and independence in radiology and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 738 , RAD 850  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 510 , RAD 770 , RAD 896  

    Fees
    Course Materials: $30.00





  
  •  

    RAD 620 - Clinical Education VI


    4.5 credits
    This course is one semester, students will continue to perform radiographic procedures with minimal supervision, exercising independent judgement, perfecting the techniques and procedures previously experienced. This course will guide students to gain the basic knowledge of an entry-level radiologic technologist, all while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 690 , RAD 946  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 570 , RAD 738 , RAD 850  

    Fees
    Course Materials: $30.00





  
  •  

    RAD 690 - Cross Sectional Anatomy


    1 credits
    This is a one semester course that includes the principles and applications of cross-sectional anatomy. The student will explore radiology modalities studying the regions of the body in a transverse, sagittal, or coronal section and will be able to identify the anatomy of that area. This course will help students to gain knowledge of cross-sectional anatomy and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 946 , RAD 620  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 570 , RAD 738 , RAD 850  

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    RAD 738 - Radiologic Pathology


    2 credits
    This is a one semester course and is designed to familiarize the student with certain changes that occur in disease and injury and how they apply to radiologic technology. This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. This course will help students expand their patient care skills with relation to awareness of patient's disease and injuries and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 570 , RAD 850  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 510 , RAD 770 , RAD 896  

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    RAD 770 - Image Critique and Evaluation


    2.5 credits
    This is a one semester course; students study the criteria for diagnostic quality radiographs. This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. The principles of image evaluation are emphasized as it relates to technique, collimation, radiation protection, positioning and radiographic quality. This course will help students gain knowledge of image critique and evaluation and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist's job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 896 , RAD 510  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 163 , RAD 182 , RAD 270  

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    ENG 105   and a computer course with a C or higher



    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    RAD 850 - Radiation Protection & Biology


    3 credits
    This is a one semester course which explores the history and biological effects of ionizing radiation. This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree.  Methods of radiation measurement detection and protection are discussed. This course will help students to gain knowledge radiation protection and biology and will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 738 , RAD 570  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 510 , RAD 770 , RAD 896  

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    RAD 896 - Quality Assurance


    2 credits
    This is a one semester course; students explore the theory and practice of quality assurance in the diagnostic radiology department. This course is designed for students who are pursuing a radiologic technology degree. The use of quality assurance test tools, interpretation of results and management of a quality assurance program through record keeping is investigated in the laboratory. This course will help students analyze the practice of quality assurance will help provide entry-level skills related specifically to radiologic technologist's job duties while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 510 , RAD 770  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 163 , RAD 182 , RAD 270  

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    ENG 105  and a computer course with a C or higher



    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    RAD 946 - Seminar


    2 credits
    This course is one semester, students re-examine material learned throughout the radiologic technology program. Special topics will be selected for group discussions, specifically pertaining to the ARRT content specifications for the radiography examination. This course will guide students to gain the basic knowledge of an entry-level radiologic technologist, all while enhancing their overall knowledge when making important life decisions.

    Corequisites
    RAD 690 , RAD 620  

    Prerequisites
    RAD 570 , RAD 738 , RAD 850  

    Fees
    None






Reading

  
  •  

    RDG 010 - Reading I


    1 credits
    This course provides opportunities for students to implement a variety of reading practices and study strategies to improve comprehension of college textbooks. This course does not meet graduation credit requirements for certificate, diploma, general studies, or associate degree programs, but it will provide students with a foundation of effective skills, tools, and strategies to support them on their path to achieving academic, personal, and professional success.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    RDG 048 - Basic Reading


    4 credits
    This course introduces students to strategies that, when applied properly, will improve their literacy skills. This course provides opportunities for students to implement a variety of reading and study practices, including expanded vocabulary, note-taking and test-taking strategies, and critical analysis and problem-solving, to improve comprehension of textbooks, scholarly articles, and college-level tests. This course does not meet graduation credit requirements for certificate, diploma, general studies, or associate degree programs, but it will provide students with a foundation of effective skills, tools, and strategies to support them on their path to achieving academic, personal, and professional success.

    Prerequisites
    Mandatory Placement Levels for RDG 048: ACCUPLACER (Classic - Reading Comprehension): < 43; ACCUPLACER (Next Gen. - Reading): < 225; ACT (Reading) 0-13; SAT (Reading) Score March '16-Present (Evidence-Based Reading & Writing): < 380; SAT (Reading) Score March '16-Present (Reading): <19

    Fees
    None






Recreation

  
  •  

    REC 120 - Sports Facililties Management


    3 credits
    This course is the Introduction course within the Sports and Recreation Management Program, and will teach the student skills specific to managing sports and recreation facilities. Illustrative examples of facilities students will gain knowledge of include: recreation and fitness centers, and specialty facilities such as sports complexes, golf/tennis clubs, swimming pools, arenas and stadiums. The student will gain valuable information on the day-to-day operations of these various sports facilities and the intricacies involved in each different facility. Overviews in critical areas of facility management include: staffing, customer service, human relations, budgeting, analysis of financial statements, inventory control, safety, physical plant operations, risk management, and marketing.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    REC 130 - Intro. to Recreation Administration


    3 credits
    This course will teach the student skills specific to managing a sports/recreation organization. Illustrative examples of sports/recreation administration students will gain knowledge of include: the different types of recreation organizations that exist and their functions, the positions and job duties within a sports/recreation organization, current trends and issues affecting the sports/recreation industry, facility planning, fundraising, and various principles in leadership/styles of leadership.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    REC 135 - Sports Facilities Marketing


    3 credits
    This course will teach students skills specific to effective marketing and promoting a variety of sports and recreation venues. Students will gain knowledge in: tools used in marketing, market segmentation, target marketing to different populations, effective communication skills and strategies, and internal vs. external marketing. A portion of the course will provide students specific skills for marketing themselves to sports/recreation organizations; resumes, cover letters, and interview skills.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    REC 145 - Outdoor Recreation


    3 credits
    This course will teach the student skills specific to the various forms of outdoor recreation and issues associated therewith. Students will gain knowledge in the types of outdoor recreation programming, organized vs. unstructured play, playgrounds and playground safety, components to successful park and playground design, outdoor recreation accessibility and accommodation, risk and liability, staffing of venues, and the economic impact of outdoor recreation in our society.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    REC 155 - Recreational Activity Management


    3 credits
    This course will teach the student skills specific to planning and organizing recreation and sports activities. Students will gain knowledge in: the differences in leisure based and competitive recreation activity management, aspects critical to the successful implementation of sports and recreation events and programs, staffing and staff management, volunteer management, risk and liability, activity logistics, trends in sports activities, customer service, program evaluations, demographic programming, and hands-on experience in assisting with a sports/recreation event or activity.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    REC 238 - Field Experience in Sports Management


    3 credits
    The course is designed to provide the student with practical experience in a sport related business, industry or organization. Students participate in various components and functions of the management and operation of a sport or fitness facility or sport organization or business. Students can be placed

    in a professional or amateur sport entertainment facility or organization, for-profit or nonprofit organization, sporting goods related facility, or within a sport services or sport tourism business or organization.

    Prerequisites
    REC 155 - Recreational Activity Management    

  
  •  

    REC 932 - Internship


    4 credits
    This course provides an opportunity to gain practical experience through on-site training in an approved business or governmental office. The actual training will be at the job site and will be under the supervision of a designated person in the business and will be coordinated by the program coordinator. This course is taken by students in the Recreation and Facility Management program. It is to be taken after the first year of classes is completed or with the permission of the program coordinator


Religion

  
  •  

    REL 105 - Introduction to Religion


    3 credits
    This course examines various ways in which religion has been a social force in world cultures. A study is made of various religious answers to the ultimate questions posed by human life, including ideas about what is good or bad. Students will gain knowledge about major world religions. This course prepares students for careers that require cultural awareness and global perspectives.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    REL 927 - Honors Study


    1-3 credits
    In this course, the student designs and completes a project of personal interest. The student will work closely with a faculty member who will act as a mentor and provide expertise throughout the semester. Upon project's completion, results will be shared with community of peers and faculty.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites
    SDV 230 - Introduction to Honors  



    Fees
    None






Student Development

  
  •  

    SDV 107 - Health Science College Experience


    1 credits
    This course will introduce Pre-Health Science students to the colleges expectations, environment, and resources so that they may become competent learners.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    SDV 108 - The College Experience


    1 credits
    This course will introduce students to the colleges expectations, environment, and resources so that they may become more competent learners.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    SDV 112 - Success Seminar


    2 credits
    In this course, students explore proven strategies for success in college and in life. Success Seminar provides exposure to college and cultural activities and helps students develop personal and professional skills, with a particular emphasis on self-management, interdependence, self-awareness, learning and study skills, emotional intelligence, self-acceptance, effective communication, and creative and critical thinking. This course is designed to ensure success in college courses, programs, and activities, while also helping to prepare students for eventual transfer and/or future employment.

    Fees
    ebook/Access Code: $119.99 (charged once per term for all courses that use Cengage Unlimited)





  
  •  

    SDV 116 - Strategies for Online Academic Success


    1 credits
    This course is specifically designed for the online learner and will introduce students to the college's expectations, environment, and resources so that they may become more competent online learners. Students will learn skills such as time management and study habits. They will also learn about academic integrity and how to become a successful online student.

    Fees
    None





  
  •  

    SDV 118 - The Online Experience


    3 credits
    As more and more of our daily life moves online, this course will provide students the understanding and expectation of learning and operating in an online environment. Students will learn skills such as time management and study habits. They will also learn about academic integrity and how to become a successful online student.

    Prerequisites
    Enrolled in an eight-week online program

    Fees
    None





 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11